business as usual

The Guardian, slightly surprisingly, finds a whole news page today for a report from the Chartered Institute of Management on, less surprisingly, “Management Futures”.  More people will work from home, apparently.

Download the thing, and you will find it is pretty slight (though there is a full “environmental scanning” report which you may have in May, for a mere £200.) The bits available now give no hint about methods, contain virtually no numbers – not even virtual numbers – and are in bite-sized chunks, which look more or less randomly assembled.

This is especially so for the less probable scenarios they run through. The environment (as opposed to the business environment) gets a single mention. Admittedly the horizon is only ten years, but was there really no further discussion of climate change? And the actual disaster mentioned, oddly, is an earthquake in Tokyo. Doubtless that would be bad for business, but other risks might need considering too, one feels.

I did like this one, though:

“A major terrorist attack wipes out  infrastructures and hubs of business travel like Heathrow and JFK in several Western countries simultaneously. Global business slows down considerably as business travel jams”.

Scary, eh?

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One Comment on “business as usual”

  1. Katy Price Says:

    Two things struck me in this Guardian article –
    First, the prediction that in our future there would be ‘fewer employees able to avoid looking after older relatives’.
    Second, the unspoken cliche nestling between these two sentences:
    ‘As social changes from the past 30 years take root, women will move into higher management positions. Emotional intelligence and the ability to appreciate people’s values as much as their technical competencies will be seen by recruiters as increasingly important.’

    I’d like a microchip that enables me to listen to my parents as if they are somebody else’s. And a computer virus that gives an extra holiday allowance to emotional-technical hybrid men.


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